facebook linkedin twitter

Experiential, Digital, and Sustainable Are the Future of Science Education

February 20, 2020 by Kate Michael
Experiential, Digital, and Sustainable Are the Future of Science Education

WASHINGTON — Environmental activist Greta Thunberg was a recurring topic of conversation at Axios’ first Washington, D.C. event of the year, held this week. The event consisted of a series of conversations dedicated to the future of science education and digital learning.  

Educators and other industry stakeholders were joined by a faction of Fridays for Future volunteers, members of a youth movement that began in August 2018 after then-15-year-old Thunberg protested the lack of climate action in front of the Swedish parliament. 

“What can we learn from Greta?” asked Smithsonian Science Education Center Director Dr. Carol O’Donnell. “The voice of youth really matters.”

“Schools alone can’t solve the problems that students need to be prepared for the future,” she said, advocating for facilitated learning by doing and experiencing, taking field trips, or freeform learning on a digital platform. 



Using Thunberg’s momentum as an example to “get kids as directly engaged as possible,” O’Donnell reminded those attending that it’s not enough to teach through the problems of today, but that the future of STEM requires teaching critical thinking skills for sustainable development. 

Tom Davidson, founder of EverFi, an “online platform for creating community impact,” seconded the idea of engagement and spoke of incorporating popular gaming components and pattern recognition for problem-solving into curricula for subjects like financial literacy, sexual violence, and compassion/anti-bullying. He said that by using play to focus on new skills, these lessons will be more likely to keep youth’s attention as well as their retention.

“It has taken this country 400 years to disadvantage kids so perfectly and with such precision that we need to bring bazookas to fix it,” he said, adding that the learning experience has been largely the same throughout history, but that modern classrooms can use technology to treat students, and their individual learning styles, uniquely. 


Retired United States Marine Corps Major General Charles Bolden, Jr., a former NASA administrator and former astronaut, said, “In this day and age, discourse trumps data. If you can’t tell a story, [the youth] aren’t interested.

“Our young people are the space generation, the Mars generation actually…. But people who want to go to Mars as an alternative, forget it.  We are on the one planet that we know can sustain life, and believe me, you don’t want to live in a spacesuit. So love this planet. Clean it up.” 

A+
a-

In The News

Health

Voting

Education

May 19, 2022
by Dan McCue
Kansas State Team Wins Collegiate Wind Competition

WASHINGTON — A team of Kansas State University students have won the U.S. Department of Energy’s 2022 Collegiate Wind Competition.... Read More

WASHINGTON — A team of Kansas State University students have won the U.S. Department of Energy’s 2022 Collegiate Wind Competition. Over the course of the past school year, teams from 12 colleges and universities, as well as four “learn-along” teams designed, built and tested model wind... Read More

May 19, 2022
by Tom Ramstack
Congressmen Criticize State Laws Censoring Education on Controversial Issues

WASHINGTON — Teachers and students warned a congressional panel Thursday that recent state laws clamping down on politically volatile instruction... Read More

WASHINGTON — Teachers and students warned a congressional panel Thursday that recent state laws clamping down on politically volatile instruction in schools are likely to backfire by breeding intolerance. Seventeen states passed laws in the past two years intended to protect children from offensive sexual or... Read More

May 13, 2022
by Madeline Hughes
More School Buses Could Get Wi-Fi

WASHINGTON — Adding Wi-Fi to school buses could be easier for school districts because of a proposed rule change by... Read More

WASHINGTON — Adding Wi-Fi to school buses could be easier for school districts because of a proposed rule change by the Federal Communications Commission. The new rule, if adopted, would allow districts to apply for funding to connect school buses to wireless internet through the E-Rate... Read More

May 9, 2022
by Dan McCue
Illinois Utility Invites Young Women to Participate in EV Rally

CHICAGO — Commonwealth Edison Company, the electric service provider to more than 4 million customers across northern Illinois, is holding... Read More

CHICAGO — Commonwealth Edison Company, the electric service provider to more than 4 million customers across northern Illinois, is holding an “EV rally” this summer to encourage young women to choose future careers in science, technology, engineering and math. The utility, also known as ComEd, has... Read More

May 5, 2022
by Tom Ramstack
High Student Debt Raises Calls for Forgiveness Program

WASHINGTON — Financial experts told shocking stories Thursday at a Senate hearing of former college students trying to decide between... Read More

WASHINGTON — Financial experts told shocking stories Thursday at a Senate hearing of former college students trying to decide between basic necessities or paying their student debt. In some cases, the experts said the debt interfered with owning their homes, taking care of their families and... Read More

April 28, 2022
by Dan McCue
Student Loan Debt Forgiveness Could Make for Long Hot Summer

WASHINGTON — A trial balloon floated by the president during a wide-ranging meeting with members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus... Read More

WASHINGTON — A trial balloon floated by the president during a wide-ranging meeting with members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus could become the latest point of contention between the White House and Republicans on Capitol Hill. During a Monday meeting with seven members of the caucus,... Read More

News From The Well
scroll top