Dismissed Student Sues Georgetown As National Admission Scandal Grows

May 21, 2019 by Tom Ramstack
Dismissed Student Sues Georgetown As National Admission Scandal Grows

A Georgetown University undergraduate is suing the university after his father pleaded guilty to paying a bribe to help his son’s academic career in another example of the national college admissions scandal.

The lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia accuses the university of depriving the student of his due process rights as he tried unsuccessfully to avoid potential discipline and expulsion.

Adam Semprevivo claims the university subjected him to an arbitrary and capricious disciplinary procedure. It also alleges a breach of contract.

The lawsuit seeks damages and injunctive relief against the dismissal.

“Georgetown has failed to conduct disciplinary proceedings in this case that comply with any notions of fundamental fairness,” the complaint said.

The same day the lawsuit was filed, the university notified Semprevivo and an unnamed second student that their admissions were being rescinded. They also are losing their college credits.

A statement from the university said, “Following the March 2019 indictments, Georgetown University began conducting a process of thoroughly reviewing the newly available information related to the alleged scheme, contacting current students who may have been involved and giving each individual student an opportunity to respond. Knowingly misrepresenting or falsifying credentials in an application can be cause for rescinding the admission of the student and dismissal from Georgetown.”

The Georgetown junior had offered to withdraw from the school if he could keep

his academic credits but university officials rejected the offer. They also planned to put unfavorable notations in his transcript.

His father is California businessman Stephen Semprevivo, who pleaded guilty this month in a Boston court to conspiring to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud. He admitted to paying a consultant $400,000 to help get his son into Georgetown.

The consultant then allegedly paid off former Georgetown tennis coach Gordon Ernst, who helped Semprevivo’s admission to the university by claiming him as a recruit to the tennis team. Semprevivo did not play competitive tennis.

Similar allegations have been made against wealthy parents and celebrities nationwide recently in a wave of allegations that they paid admissions consultants who used bribes or falsified test answers to get their children into highly-rated schools.

Legal analysts said the chances for a successful lawsuit by Semprevivo or other persons accused of fraudulently seeking college admissions were small.

“I can’t see any basis” for the lawsuit, said former U.S. Attorney Michael J. Moore during an interview on the Fox News Channel.

He added, “I don’t think there’s any question but that he should be expelled.”

Kisha M. Hebbon, a New Jersey-based attorney and former prosecutor, said Semprevivo’s claim that his due process rights were violated disappeared when he appeared to consent to his father’s bribery.

“I believe he lost that privilege,” Hebbon said.

Prosecutors said in their court filings that father and son Semprevivo submitted “fabricated representations” to Georgetown University about Adam’s “purported tennis experience.”

They included emails to the tennis coach and a university application essay that “falsely indicated that he played tennis during all four years of high school and was ranked in single and doubles tennis,” according to prosecutors.

The essay says in part, “When I walk into a room people will normally look up and make a comment about my height — I’m 6’5” — and ask me if I play basketball. With a smile, I nod my head, but also insist that the sport I put my most energy into is tennis.”

A+
a-
  • Georgetown University
  • lawsuit
  • In The News

    Health

    Voting

    Education

    June 14, 2024
    by Tom Ramstack
    Congressional Bill Would Prevent Student Athletes Being Employees

    WASHINGTON — A U.S. House committee approved a bill Thursday that would prevent student athletes from being categorized as employees... Read More

    WASHINGTON — A U.S. House committee approved a bill Thursday that would prevent student athletes from being categorized as employees of their universities. A National Labor Relations Board judge ruled in February that student athletes were university employees, thereby allowing them to earn salaries and to... Read More

    June 10, 2024
    by Dan McCue
    Boston School District Goes All Green With Geothermal Energy

    BOSTON — A Boston school district is reaping the benefits of clean energy after deciding that its most recently built... Read More

    BOSTON — A Boston school district is reaping the benefits of clean energy after deciding that its most recently built elementary school will run entirely on a geothermal system, with no fossil fuel use on-site. In the year since it opened, the Boardwalk Campus of the... Read More

    May 24, 2024
    by Beth McCue
    Winners of DOE’s 2024 Marine Energy Collegiate Competition Announced

    WASHINGTON — The winner of this year’s Marine Energy Collegiate Competition, the University of New Hampshire, took the top honors... Read More

    WASHINGTON — The winner of this year’s Marine Energy Collegiate Competition, the University of New Hampshire, took the top honors for creating a surface research drifter, a buoy that uses ocean energy to collect accurate oceanic weather observations and forecasting. Marine energy technologies harness the power... Read More

    Community Colleges Offer Clean Energy Training as Climate-Related Jobs Expand Across America

    DANVILLE, Illinois (AP) — On the south side of Chicago, students learn to work on Rivian electric pickup trucks and... Read More

    DANVILLE, Illinois (AP) — On the south side of Chicago, students learn to work on Rivian electric pickup trucks and SUVs through a new technician program at Olive-Harvey College. About 150 miles (240 kilometers) south, students at Danville Area Community College in Illinois are taught to... Read More

    70 Years Ago, School Integration was a Dream Many Believed Could Actually Happen. It Hasn't.

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Seventy years ago this week, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled separating children in schools by race was... Read More

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Seventy years ago this week, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled separating children in schools by race was unconstitutional. On paper, that decision — the fabled Brown v. Board of Education, taught in most every American classroom — still stands. But for decades, American schools... Read More

    The Latest | Police Break Up Protests, Make Arrests at UCLA, Yale, Dartmouth, New York Schools

    AP — Arrests continue on campuses around the U.S. as police dismantle camps of students protesting Israel’s war in Gaza.... Read More

    AP — Arrests continue on campuses around the U.S. as police dismantle camps of students protesting Israel’s war in Gaza. At UCLA, officers removed barricades and moved in on hundreds of protesters who defied orders to leave, scuffling with protesters and detaining some. Other arrests were... Read More

    News From The Well
    scroll top