Loading...

Bipartisan Bill Aims to Make College Credits Easier to Transfer

July 20, 2021 by Ansley Puckett
Bipartisan Bill Aims to Make College Credits Easier to Transfer
(Photo by Dan McCue)

Bipartisan legislation aimed at removing a bureaucratic obstacle which prevents some students from receiving their degree or certification is being proposed by Sens. Mark Warner, D-Va., Mike Braun, R-Ind., John Hickenlooper, D-Colo. and Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass.

The Reverse Transfer Efficiency Act of 2021 would ease the reverse transferring of college credits. Reverse transferring is the process of transferring credits from a four-year institution to a two-year institution where the student was previously enrolled to identify if they earned enough credits along the way to receive a degree. 

Facilitating the practice of reverse transfer would ease students’ access to the credentials they earned and better provide for future economic demands, according to a release. 

“This much-needed bill would help to eliminate an unnecessary hurdle for students who’ve worked hard and paid for their studies,” Warner said. “In a competitive job market, this bipartisan bill will help more Americans claim the degree or credentials that they have rightfully earned.” 

The Reverse Transfer Efficiency Act of 2021 would also amend the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act to create a new exemption for higher education institutions to share student education records. 

The bill would also allow post-secondary institutions to share credit data to determine whether a student earned an associate degree or certificate during their studies. Currently, FERPA requires students to give their institutions permission to determine whether they have enough credits to earn a degree or certificate. 

“Our education system has to support different paths to a successful career,” Hickenlooper said. “Many students who graduate high school never get a four-year degree. Making it easier to recognize the work students have already done is a no-brainer.” 

Reps. Joe Neguse, D-Colo., John Curtis, R-Utah and Joaquin Castro, D-Texas, have proposed companion legislation in the House of Representatives. 

“We must ensure every student is provided a pathway to education that fits their goals and career path,” Neguse said. “This legislation ensures that students can receive credit and earn an associate degree or short-term certificate regardless of where they completed their coursework, breaking down barriers for better paying jobs for students who are unable to finish at a four-year institution.” 

Support for the bill comes from organizations such as the American Association of Community Colleges, the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, the Virginia Community College System, and the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admission Officers. 

Melanie Gottlieb, interim executive director of the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admission Officers, said the organization believes the legislation will enable institutions to increase education attainment and salaries for millions of individuals. 

In The News

Health

Voting

Education

June 27, 2022
by Dan McCue
Supreme Court Sides With High School Coach Who Prayed at 50-Yard Line

WASHINGTON —  A divided U.S. Supreme Court on Monday sided with a high school football coach who claimed the public... Read More

WASHINGTON —  A divided U.S. Supreme Court on Monday sided with a high school football coach who claimed the public school district that employed him violated his free speech and free exercise rights by barring him from praying on the field after games. The 6-3 ruling... Read More

June 21, 2022
by Dan McCue
Supreme Court Strikes Down Maine Policy Barring Tuition Aid for Religious Schools

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court on Tuesday struck down a longstanding education policy in Maine that made K-12 schools with... Read More

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court on Tuesday struck down a longstanding education policy in Maine that made K-12 schools with religious instruction ineligible for taxpayer-backed tuition aid. Writing for the majority in the 6-3 decision, Chief Justice John Roberts held the state’s so-called “nonsectarian” requirement for... Read More

June 3, 2022
by Reece Nations
NY Assembly Approves Classroom Size Caps Despite Funding Concerns

ALBANY, N.Y. — A bill to limit the number of students in New York schools passed the state Legislature along... Read More

ALBANY, N.Y. — A bill to limit the number of students in New York schools passed the state Legislature along with an extension of mayoral control over the public school system late on Thursday night. The legislation to cap class sizes was tied to mayoral control... Read More

May 27, 2022
by Dan McCue
Energy Dept Launches New Solar Workforce Development Programs

WASHINGTON — The Energy Department has launched two new Solar Decathlon workforce development programs intended to extend the collegiate competition... Read More

WASHINGTON — The Energy Department has launched two new Solar Decathlon workforce development programs intended to extend the collegiate competition into high school classrooms and architectural studios across the country. The two programs, Solar Decathlon Professions (SD Pro) and Solar Decathlon Pathways (SD Pathways) are intended... Read More

May 19, 2022
by Dan McCue
Kansas State Team Wins Collegiate Wind Competition

WASHINGTON — A team of Kansas State University students have won the U.S. Department of Energy’s 2022 Collegiate Wind Competition.... Read More

WASHINGTON — A team of Kansas State University students have won the U.S. Department of Energy’s 2022 Collegiate Wind Competition. Over the course of the past school year, teams from 12 colleges and universities, as well as four “learn-along” teams designed, built and tested model wind... Read More

May 19, 2022
by Tom Ramstack
Congressmen Criticize State Laws Censoring Education on Controversial Issues

WASHINGTON — Teachers and students warned a congressional panel Thursday that recent state laws clamping down on politically volatile instruction... Read More

WASHINGTON — Teachers and students warned a congressional panel Thursday that recent state laws clamping down on politically volatile instruction in schools are likely to backfire by breeding intolerance. Seventeen states passed laws in the past two years intended to protect children from offensive sexual or... Read More

News From The Well