CIA Suffered Historic Data Loss From Lax Cybersecurity, Report Says

June 17, 2020by Gopal Ratnam, CQ-Roll Call (TNS)
The CIA seal is seen on the floor during a visit by President Donald Trump on Jan. 21, 2017, at the CIA headquarters in Langley, Va. (Olivier Douliery/Pool/Sipa USA/TNS)

WASHINGTON — In early 2017 the Central Intelligence Agency suffered a massive data loss when an agency employee stole vast quantities of information including some of its most secretive hacking tools because of lax cybersecurity measures, according to a redacted investigation report obtained by Sen. Ron Wyden, a senior member of the Senate Intelligence Committee.

The employee took away about 180 gigabytes to as much as 34 terabytes — or the equivalent of about 11.6 million to 2.2 billion pages of Microsoft Word documents — which included some of the agency’s most valuable hacking tools from its so-called Vault 7, according to the report. The employee later gave the data to WikiLeaks, which published it in a series of posts.

Citing the CIA’s task force report that examined the breach, Wyden said in a letter addressed to the newly installed Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe that the agency had “prioritized building cyber weapons at the expense of securing their own systems.”

In a statement accompanying the letter, Wyden said his office obtained the redacted investigative report after the Justice Department introduced the material as evidence in a court case. Federal prosecutors have charged former software engineer Joshua Shulte, but his family and lawyers have said he is not responsible, The New York Times reported in 2018.

The probe into the CIA leak found that the agency’s “day-to-day security practices had become woefully lax … most of our sensitive cyber weapons were not compartmented” and users shared their passwords with one another. The CIA’s Center for Cyber Intelligence had no plan on mitigation if its weapons were stolen, the investigation found.

The CIA’s hacking tools developed between 2013 and 2016 had been used by the agency to penetrate web browsers including Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge and Mozilla Firefox, as well as smart cars and smart TVs.

Wyden said that U.S. intelligence agencies must begin complying with U.S. law which requires federal agencies to comply with cybersecurity standards and technologies developed by the Department of Homeland Security. Congress had previously exempted U.S. intelligence agencies from that provision.

“It’s now clear that exempting the intelligence community from baseline cybersecurity requirements was a mistake,” Wyden said in his June 16 letter.

Wyden also asked Ratcliffe to answer in an unclassified report questions on how the intelligence agencies are addressing cybersecurity risks, including steps they have taken to secure their websites using multi-factor authentication, employing anti-phishing technologies, and steps the agencies would take to comply with the 22 recommendations made by the Inspector General of the Intelligence Community on tightening cybersecurity standards.

Wyden said U.S. intelligence agencies have yet to require multi-factor authentication on their websites as required by the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, which issued the recommendation in early 2019. The spy agencies also have failed to adopt anti-phishing technologies, another recommendation made by CISA in October 2017, Wyden said.

———

©2020 CQ-Roll Call, Inc., All Rights Reserved

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Cybersecurity

US: Hack of Federal Agencies Likely Russian in Origin'
Cybersecurity
US: Hack of Federal Agencies Likely Russian in Origin'

WASHINGTON (AP) — Top national security agencies confirmed Tuesday that Russia was likely responsible for a massive hack of U.S. government departments and corporations, rejecting President Donald Trump's claim that China might be to blame. The rare joint statement represented the U.S. government's first formal attempt... Read More

Biden's Team Vows Action Against Hack as US Threats Persist
Cybercrime
Biden's Team Vows Action Against Hack as US Threats Persist

WASHINGTON (AP) — Once in office, President-elect Joe Biden will punish Russia for its suspected cyberespionage operation against the United States with financial sanctions and measures to hobble the Kremlin's ability to launch future hacks, his chief of staff said Sunday, as a GOP senator criticized President Donald... Read More

Murphy Urges Leadership to Request House-wide Briefing on Suspected Russian Hack
Cybersecurity
Murphy Urges Leadership to Request House-wide Briefing on Suspected Russian Hack
December 18, 2020
by Dan McCue

WASHINGTON - Rep. Stephanie Murphy, D-Fla., is urging House leadership to schedule a classified, bipartisan briefing for members of Congress regarding the recently revealed cyberattack on the networks of the federal government and major American companies. The attack is widely believed to have been the work... Read More

US Cybersecurity Agency Warns of 'Grave' Threat from Hack
Cybercrime
US Cybersecurity Agency Warns of 'Grave' Threat from Hack

WASHINGTON -- The federal government's top cybersecurity agency on Thursday issued its most urgent warning yet about a sophisticated and extensive computer breach, saying it posed a "grave risk" to cyber networks maintained by governments, utilities and the private sector and could be difficult to purge.... Read More

Fired Cybersecurity Official Rebuts GOP Claims of Election Fraud at Senate Hearing
Cybersecurity
Fired Cybersecurity Official Rebuts GOP Claims of Election Fraud at Senate Hearing

WASHINGTON — The U.S. cybersecurity chief fired by President Donald Trump last month after he pushed back on allegations of election fraud testified before Congress on Wednesday that such baseless conspiracy theories are having a “corrosive” effect on the public’s faith in the nation’s voting system.... Read More

Hacking Spree by Suspected Russians Included US Think Tank
Cybercrime
Hacking Spree by Suspected Russians Included US Think Tank

The suspected Russian hackers behind a global campaign of cyberattacks that have breached U.S. government agencies also hit an American think tank, according to a cybersecurity firm that has been fighting them off. For the better part of a year, investigators at Volexity have been battling... Read More

News From The Well
scroll top