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Anthropocene

Anthropocene magazine, published by Future Earth,  gathers the worlds’ best minds to explore how we might create a Human Age that we actually want to live in. 


Authors published under this byline include:

Berly McCoy is a freelance science writer and media producer based in Northwest Montana covering biology, chemistry, food and the environment. Her work has appeared in Scientific American, PBS NewsHour, NPR, Hakai and elsewhere. Find her on Twitter at @travlinscientst.

Emma Bryce is a journalist based in London. As well as Anthropocene, her work has appeared in The Guardian, Wired Magazine UK, Audubon Magazine, The New York Times, Ensia, and Yale e360.

Prachi Patel is a Pittsburgh-based freelance journalist who writes about energy, materials science, nanotechnology, biotechnology, and computing. Writes for Scientific American, IEEE Spectrum, Chemical & Engineering News, and MRS Bulletin. Find her at www.lekh.org.

Sarah DeWeerdt is a Seattle-based freelance science journalist specializing in biology, medicine, and the environment. In addition to Anthropocene, her work has appeared in Nature, Newsweek, Nautilus, Spectrum, and many other publications. Find her on Twitter at @DeWeerdt_Sarah.

Recent Work

Combining 3 Existing Technologies Makes Emissions-Free Plastics Possible. . . and Affordable
Environment
Combining 3 Existing Technologies Makes Emissions-Free Plastics Possible. . . and Affordable
October 14, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Prachi Patel and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. The world was already drowning in plastic when the Covid-19 pandemic hit. The use of protective equipment and surge in takeout and home delivery more than doubled the world’s plastic waste in 2020 over the previous... Read More

The Most Comprehensive Study Ever Reveals Which are the Greenest ‘Blue Foods’
Food
The Most Comprehensive Study Ever Reveals Which are the Greenest ‘Blue Foods’
October 13, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Emma Bryce and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. What is the role of fish in a sustainable food future? Compared to other food groups, we have limited knowledge about the environmental impact of blue foods when it comes to greenhouse gas emissions and ecosystem... Read More

When One Person Uses a Ride-Hailing App, all of Society Pays
In The News
When One Person Uses a Ride-Hailing App, all of Society Pays
October 5, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Sarah DeWeerdt and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. A car trip made via ride-hailing app such as Uber or Lyft has external costs that are 30-35% higher than a comparable trip made via a personal vehicle, according to a new study. The ride-hailing app... Read More

Car Emissions are a Wasted Resource. We Could Use Them to Grow Food.
Environment
Car Emissions are a Wasted Resource. We Could Use Them to Grow Food.
September 29, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Emma Bryce and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. A single car pumps out 4.5 tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere each year. That’s environmentally destructive, never mind the enormous health impacts. But, it’s also a waste of a hugely valuable resource. What if... Read More

A Spoonful of Sugar Makes a Better Battery
Science
A Spoonful of Sugar Makes a Better Battery
September 21, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Prachi Patel and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. By simply adding a dash of sugar, researchers in Australia have boosted the life of a type of battery that could drive electric vehicles twice as far on a single charge as today’s lithium-ion batteries. The... Read More

Insects and Fallen Trees Are a Potent Duo When It Comes to Climate Change
Science
Insects and Fallen Trees Are a Potent Duo When It Comes to Climate Change
September 14, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Warren Cornwall and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. When tallying up the myriad things sending planet-warming gases into the atmosphere, don’t overlook bugs. While humans drive up the overall levels of greenhouse gases by burning fossil fuels, a variety of natural forces shape how... Read More

Tiny Chemical “Nanojars” Could Remove Carbon Dioxide From Lakes and Oceans
Environment
Tiny Chemical “Nanojars” Could Remove Carbon Dioxide From Lakes and Oceans
September 7, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Prachi Patel and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. In what could be an important tool to clean up our lakes and oceans, researchers have made ‘nanojars’ that can capture carbon dioxide and toxins from water. The simple chemical route, presented at the American Chemical Society... Read More

First-of-its-Kind Study Shows That Diverse Landscapes Could Boost US Crop Yields by 20 Percent
Environment
First-of-its-Kind Study Shows That Diverse Landscapes Could Boost US Crop Yields by 20 Percent
August 27, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Emma Bryce and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. Increasing land cover diversity in agricultural landscapes is about more than protecting nature: it could also increase crop yields across large areas of the United States by up to 20%, according to a recent Nature Food study.  Studies... Read More

Probiotics Could Help Save Overheated Coral
Environment
Probiotics Could Help Save Overheated Coral
August 18, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Warren Cornwall and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. At a time when the word “microbiome” has made it into the popular lexicon and people extol the benefits of yogurt, kombucha and other fermented foods, there could be another beneficiary of bacterial infusions: coral. In... Read More

We Can’t Depend on Extreme Weather to Increase Support for Climate Action
Climate
We Can’t Depend on Extreme Weather to Increase Support for Climate Action
August 17, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Sarah DeWeerdt and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. Experiencing unusual weather events does not change people’s climate policy preferences, according to an analysis of German survey data. Neither climate deniers nor acceptors are moved by local weather, the researchers found. Past studies have shown... Read More

Fairer Access to Credit Could Speed Net Zero in Africa by a Decade
Economy
Fairer Access to Credit Could Speed Net Zero in Africa by a Decade
August 10, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Sarah DeWeerdt and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. Meeting the goals of the Paris Agreement will require hundreds of billions or even trillions of dollars of investment in low-carbon technologies. But investment dollars aren’t distributed equally around the world, nor are credit terms comparable... Read More

A New Study Provides a Nuanced—and Ultimately Hopeful—View of the Climate Generation Gap
Environment
A New Study Provides a Nuanced—and Ultimately Hopeful—View of the Climate Generation Gap
August 3, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Sarah DeWeerdt and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. Climate concern is increasing among all age groups, raising hopes that different generations can work together to solve the climate crisis, the authors of a new study say. There’s lots of evidence that climate change awareness... Read More

Microbes in Cow Stomachs Can Decompose Plastic
Environment
Microbes in Cow Stomachs Can Decompose Plastic
July 22, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Prachi Patel and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. Livestock farming produces a large share of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions, what with cows belching and farting tons of methane. But the ruminants might be unlikely allies in the world’s fight against plastic pollution. New research by scientists... Read More

Think Reusable Straws, Wraps, and Cups are Always Better for the Environment? Think Again.
Environment
Think Reusable Straws, Wraps, and Cups are Always Better for the Environment? Think Again.
July 20, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Prachi Patel and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. Single-use straws and forks, plastic sandwich bags and wraps, and disposable cups can all wreak havoc on the environment. Many consumers are switching from these products to reusable alternatives with the assumption that these products are... Read More

Plant-Based Plastic Cutlery Rarely Gets Composted. This Advance Could Give it a new Purpose.
Science
Plant-Based Plastic Cutlery Rarely Gets Composted. This Advance Could Give it a new Purpose.
July 13, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Prachi Patel and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. Using compostable forks and spoons might soothe an environmentalist’s soul, but the reality is that most of this cutlery ends up in landfills, where it sits around just like conventional petroleum-based plastics. Researchers have now found... Read More

Marine Ecosystems Rebound From Extinctions Quicker Than We Thought
In The News
Marine Ecosystems Rebound From Extinctions Quicker Than We Thought
June 30, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Berly McCoy and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. Approximately 66 million years ago, a mass extinction event wiped out the majority of all species on Earth, including most of the marine plankton species, organisms that help regulate carbon dioxide partitioning from the atmosphere. But... Read More

Turning Off Half of City Lights at Night Could Cut Bird Mortality by Up To 60 Percent
In The News
Turning Off Half of City Lights at Night Could Cut Bird Mortality by Up To 60 Percent
June 29, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Berly McCoy and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. Like an insect attracted to a bug zapper, artificial light is harming migratory birds by throwing them off course and causing deadly collisions. Now, a new study highlights just how beneficial switching off the lights can... Read More

Cities Have a Green Infrastructure Blind Spot
Infrastructure
Cities Have a Green Infrastructure Blind Spot
June 22, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Sara DeWeerdt and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. Green infrastructure has a lot of benefits: nature can improve people’s mental and physical health; vegetation helps reduce building energy use by providing insulation and cooling; and plants and soils store carbon. The... Read More

Giving Wallabies a ‘Head Start’ From Feral Cats Doubled Their Population
Science
Giving Wallabies a ‘Head Start’ From Feral Cats Doubled Their Population
June 15, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Emma Bryce and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. Conservationists working to protect endangered animals often struggle with protecting the most vulnerable from predation. But instead of working to decrease predator numbers, one research group studying endangered wallabies has shown that temporarily... Read More

Researchers Repurpose a Medical Tool to Expose Seafood Fraud
Science
Researchers Repurpose a Medical Tool to Expose Seafood Fraud
June 8, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Emma Bryce and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. Researchers have discovered that a medical device used to detect cancer in humans can also be employed to detect mislabeled seafood, and other meats—with 100% accuracy. The device, which can identify the species... Read More

Here’s Something to Chew on: Researchers Turn Food Scraps Into Materials Stronger Than Concrete
In The News
Here’s Something to Chew on: Researchers Turn Food Scraps Into Materials Stronger Than Concrete
May 27, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Prachi Patel and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. Why compost food scraps when you can make concrete with them? It’s not quite that simple, but researchers have found a way to turn fruit and vegetable scraps into tough building materials that... Read More

Researchers Experiment With “Morphing” Food to Enable More Sustainable Packaging. Behold, Flat-packed 3D Pasta
Science
Researchers Experiment With “Morphing” Food to Enable More Sustainable Packaging. Behold, Flat-packed 3D Pasta
May 25, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Emma Bryce and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. From conch-shaped pasta shells and the jaunty bow ties of farfalle, pasta in its various forms has become a culinary staple in millions of homes. But its creative 3D shapes also make this... Read More

The World Needs a Standard Tool to Compare Species Conservation Efforts. An International Team Just Built One.
Environment
The World Needs a Standard Tool to Compare Species Conservation Efforts. An International Team Just Built One.
May 18, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Berly McCoy and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. In 2010, the Convention on Biodiversity proposed a list of 20 targets aimed at preserving global biodiversity—from increasing public awareness to preventing species extinctions. The targets were part of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011–2020.... Read More

A Lot of People May Be Willing to Loosen Their Purse Strings to Subsidize Greener Farming
In The News
A Lot of People May Be Willing to Loosen Their Purse Strings to Subsidize Greener Farming
May 4, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Emma Bryce and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. What would you be willing to pay, to ensure your food came from a farm that doubled up to protect biodiversity and mitigate climate change? That’s the question a group of researchers recently... Read More

An Ingenious Off-grid Water Purifier Inspired by Pufferfish Runs on Nothing But Sunlight
Science
An Ingenious Off-grid Water Purifier Inspired by Pufferfish Runs on Nothing But Sunlight
April 27, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Prachi Patel and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. Clean water is already a scant resource in many parts of the world, and this scarcity is slated to worsen with climate change. In a new study, researchers report a simple, sustainable technology... Read More

In the Sustainability Race, the Olympic Games are Lagging Behind
In The News
In the Sustainability Race, the Olympic Games are Lagging Behind
April 20, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Sarah DeWeerdt and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. The Olympic Games are supposed to be a shining example of sustainability: host cities sign contracts that promise a sustainable event and the International Olympic Committee talks up sustainability in its strategic plans.... Read More

To Pay for Green Infrastructure, Cities are Turning Stormwater Into an Economic Resource
In The News
To Pay for Green Infrastructure, Cities are Turning Stormwater Into an Economic Resource
April 13, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Sarah DeWeerdt and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. Stormwater is a big problem for cities—and a growing one. Lots of urban surface area is impermeable, so stormwater can’t sink into the ground but instead flows through the city. Meanwhile, climate change... Read More

Researchers Turn Used Coffee Grounds Into Biodegradable Plastic
Science
Researchers Turn Used Coffee Grounds Into Biodegradable Plastic
April 9, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Prachi Patel and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. The world drinks a whole lot of coffee. And in the process produces over six million tons of coffee grounds, according to the International Coffee Organization. And much of that ends up in... Read More

Carbon Labeling of Food Shifts People’s Behavior—Even Among Those Actively Trying to Avoid Information
Science
Carbon Labeling of Food Shifts People’s Behavior—Even Among Those Actively Trying to Avoid Information
April 6, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Sarah DeWeerdt and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. Carbon footprint labels cause people to choose meat products with 25% lower climate impact, according to a study of hypothetical purchasing decisions conducted in Sweden. The study lends support to an emerging strategy... Read More

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