Anthropocene

Anthropocene magazine, published by Future Earth,  gathers the worlds’ best minds to explore how we might create a Human Age that we actually want to live in. 


Authors published under this byline include:

Emma Bryce is a journalist based in London. As well as Anthropocene, her work has appeared in The Guardian, Wired Magazine UK, Audubon Magazine, The New York Times, Ensia, and Yale e360.

Prachi Patel is a Pittsburgh-based freelance journalist who writes about energy, materials science, nanotechnology, biotechnology, and computing. Writes for Scientific American, IEEE Spectrum, Chemical & Engineering News, and MRS Bulletin. Find her at www.lekh.org.

Sarah DeWeerdt is a Seattle-based freelance science journalist specializing in biology, medicine, and the environment. In addition to Anthropocene, her work has appeared in Nature, Newsweek, Nautilus, Spectrum, and many other publications. Find her on Twitter at @DeWeerdt_Sarah.

Recent Work

Researchers Turn Used Coffee Grounds Into Biodegradable Plastic
Science
Researchers Turn Used Coffee Grounds Into Biodegradable Plastic
May 11, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Prachi Patel and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. The world drinks a whole lot of coffee. And in the process produces over six million tons of coffee grounds, according to the International Coffee Organization. And much of that ends up in... Read More

A Lot of People May Be Willing to Loosen Their Purse Strings to Subsidize Greener Farming
In The News
A Lot of People May Be Willing to Loosen Their Purse Strings to Subsidize Greener Farming
May 4, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Emma Bryce and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. What would you be willing to pay, to ensure your food came from a farm that doubled up to protect biodiversity and mitigate climate change? That’s the question a group of researchers recently... Read More

An Ingenious Off-grid Water Purifier Inspired by Pufferfish Runs on Nothing But Sunlight
Science
An Ingenious Off-grid Water Purifier Inspired by Pufferfish Runs on Nothing But Sunlight
April 27, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Prachi Patel and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. Clean water is already a scant resource in many parts of the world, and this scarcity is slated to worsen with climate change. In a new study, researchers report a simple, sustainable technology... Read More

In the Sustainability Race, the Olympic Games are Lagging Behind
In The News
In the Sustainability Race, the Olympic Games are Lagging Behind
April 20, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Sarah DeWeerdt and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. The Olympic Games are supposed to be a shining example of sustainability: host cities sign contracts that promise a sustainable event and the International Olympic Committee talks up sustainability in its strategic plans.... Read More

To Pay for Green Infrastructure, Cities are Turning Stormwater Into an Economic Resource
In The News
To Pay for Green Infrastructure, Cities are Turning Stormwater Into an Economic Resource
April 13, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Sarah DeWeerdt and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. Stormwater is a big problem for cities—and a growing one. Lots of urban surface area is impermeable, so stormwater can’t sink into the ground but instead flows through the city. Meanwhile, climate change... Read More

Carbon Labeling of Food Shifts People’s Behavior—Even Among Those Actively Trying to Avoid Information
Science
Carbon Labeling of Food Shifts People’s Behavior—Even Among Those Actively Trying to Avoid Information
April 6, 2021
by Anthropocene

This article is by Sarah DeWeerdt and was originally published by Anthropocene magazine. Carbon footprint labels cause people to choose meat products with 25% lower climate impact, according to a study of hypothetical purchasing decisions conducted in Sweden. The study lends support to an emerging strategy... Read More

In The News

Health

Voting

News From The Well
scroll top