Loading...

Evers Pardons 71, Makes Changes to Wisconsin Process

September 7, 2021 by Dan McCue
Evers Pardons 71, Makes Changes to Wisconsin Process
Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers at the National Governors Association Winter Meeting in Washington. (Photo by Dan McCue)

MADISON, Wis. — Gov. Tony Evers granted 71 pardons Tuesday, putting him on pace to pardon more people in his first term than any governor in contemporary history.

In all, Evers has pardoned 263 former inmates, since his pardon advisory board was announced in 2019. 

The board heard from applicants virtually between May and August, and the names of those being recommended for pardon were forwarded to Evers for final consideration. 

“Hearing from any one of our pardon recipients you’ll hear stories of redemption, service to others, and hope for the future,” said Evers in a written statement.

“As I said when I reinstated the pardon board, I believe in forgiveness and the power of redemption, and I believe the people of Wisconsin do, too.”

In addition to granting the 71 pardons announced Wednesday, Evers also signed Executive Order 130, making changes to the pardon process itself. 

The order creates a new, expedited process for applications that meet stricter criteria. 

Under the new process, the chair of the pardon advisory board may send an application directly to the governor without a board hearing if the applicant committed only a non-violent offense and sufficient time has passed since the conviction. 

Additionally, a new application is being issued which expands pardon eligibility to ensure individuals who have completed all their sentences after five years have passed. Previously, individuals could only be pardoned for their most recent felony. 

“After nine years of the board sitting dormant, there are a lot of people out there looking and hoping for their second chance,” Evers said. 

“Throughout the two years of the board, we have learned about some areas where we can improve the process to streamline it and help ensure we can get pardons to those who are deserving, including allowing those with low-level, nonviolent offenses to be sent directly to my desk for consideration, as well as making a correction that was preventing folks from receiving pardons not because their crimes were more serious or because they posed a greater risk to the community, but due to the timing of their convictions and sentencing.”

The Wisconsin Constitution grants the governor the power to pardon individuals convicted of a crime. A pardon is an official act of forgiveness that restores some of the rights that are lost when someone is convicted of a felony, including the right to serve on a jury, hold public office, and hold certain professional licenses. A pardon does not result in an expungement.

Under Executive Orders 30 and 130, individuals convicted of a Wisconsin felony may apply for a pardon if they completed their sentence at least five years ago and have no pending criminal charges or cases. Individuals currently required to register on the sex offender registry are ineligible for a pardon.

The next meeting of the pardon advisory board, which is being held virtually, will be on Friday, Sept. 10, 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. It will be livestreamed here.

In The News

Health

Voting

Criminal Justice

January 27, 2022
by Dan McCue
Garland Updates Bipartisan Group of Election Officials on Threat Status

WASHINGTON — U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland held a virtual discussion with a bipartisan group of election officials on Wednesday,... Read More

WASHINGTON — U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland held a virtual discussion with a bipartisan group of election officials on Wednesday, providing them with an update on the threats that have been investigated and addressed in the past several weeks. Among the updates, the Justice Department’s Election... Read More

Jury in Federal Trial in Floyd Killing Appears Mostly White

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — A jury of 18 people who appeared mostly white was picked Thursday for the federal... Read More

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — A jury of 18 people who appeared mostly white was picked Thursday for the federal trial of three Minneapolis police officers charged in George Floyd’s killing, a case that the judge told potential jurors has “absolutely nothing” to do with race. The jurors... Read More

January 20, 2022
by Dan McCue
Supreme Court Holds Trial Court Erred in Child Killing Case

WASHINGTON — A New York trial court violated a criminal defendant's Sixth Amendment rights when it allowed, over his objection,... Read More

WASHINGTON — A New York trial court violated a criminal defendant's Sixth Amendment rights when it allowed, over his objection, for the reading of a plea transcript of an unavailable witness to be admitted and read aloud in the courtroom. The case before the court, Hemphill... Read More

January 19, 2022
by Reece Nations
Arkansas Inmates Sue Jail for Treating COVID With Ivermectin Without Consent

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. — The American Civil Liberties Union of Arkansas filed a federal lawsuit on behalf of four inmates at... Read More

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. — The American Civil Liberties Union of Arkansas filed a federal lawsuit on behalf of four inmates at an Arkansas jail who were unknowingly administered ivermectin to treat their cases of COVID-19. The plaintiffs in the case allege they were misled about the drugs... Read More

January 7, 2022
by Dan McCue
Two Men Sentenced to Life Without Parole for Arbery Murder

BRUNSWICK, Ga. — A judge in Georgia sentenced the three men convicted of murdering Ahmaud Arbery to life in prison... Read More

BRUNSWICK, Ga. — A judge in Georgia sentenced the three men convicted of murdering Ahmaud Arbery to life in prison on Friday, giving two of them sentences that included no possibility of parole. Travis McMichael and his father Gregory McMichael were both sentenced to life plus... Read More

December 7, 2021
by Tom Ramstack
Senate Considers Closing Guantanamo Detention Facility

WASHINGTON — The fiasco of international politics created by the U.S. detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, drew calls to... Read More

WASHINGTON — The fiasco of international politics created by the U.S. detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, drew calls to close it down from some lawmakers Tuesday at a Senate hearing. They described the detention facility that has held suspected Muslim terrorists for 20 years as... Read More

News From The Well
Exit mobile version