Federal Judge in Idaho Stops State From Implementing Ban on Transgender Athletes

August 18, 2020by Jim Keyser, The Idaho Statesman (TNS)
Gov. Brad Little issues a statewide stay-at-home order to further prevent spread of coronavirus COVID-19 at a press conference on March 25, 2020 in Boise, Idaho. (Darin Oswald/Idaho Statesman/TNS)

BOISE, Idaho — A federal judge in Idaho has issued a temporary injunction to keep the state from implementing a controversial law banning transgender girls and women from participating in women’s sports while a legal challenge moves forward.

The ruling means that transgender athletes wanting to participate in sports that match their gender identity will be able to this fall at both the college and secondary school level.

U.S. District Judge David Nye ruled Monday that because the plaintiffs are likely to win in court as part of a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union challenging the constitutionality of the law, a preliminary injunction is warranted.

Nye said the law’s ban on transgender athletes “stands in stark contrast to the policies of elite athletic bodies that regulate sports both nationally and globally.” Nye also noted that the law “establishes a ‘dispute’ process that allows a currently undefined class of individuals to challenge a student’s sex.” The law disallowing transgender athletes from playing on a team matching their gender identity contains a provision allowing anyone to challenge a person’s identity. It then would be incumbent upon the athletes to verify their gender through an exam or genetic testing.

The law did not include transgender men and boys.

The athlete law was one of two anti-transgender measures that Idaho Republicans pushed through the Legislature in the 2020 session. Both were signed into law by Gov. Brad Little despite warnings from legal experts, including the Idaho Attorney General’s Office, that neither was likely to survive court challenges.

The other law, which prevented transgender people from changing their birth certificate to match their gender identity, has already been shelved by an Idaho judge who ruled that its implementation violated an injunction she first issued in 2018.

———

©2020 The Idaho Statesman (Boise, Idaho)

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Courts

First Slate of Biden Judicial Nominees is Diversity Personified
Courts
First Slate of Biden Judicial Nominees is Diversity Personified
March 30, 2021
by Dan McCue

WASHINGTON - President Joe Biden’s first slate of judicial nominees is a marked departure from the mostly white and mostly male picks of the Trump years. In all, Biden named 11 individuals he’d like to see on the bench, 10 to serve either as Federal  Circuit... Read More

Pre-Trial Reforms Struggle to Balance Rights of Defendants and Crime Victims
Courts
Pre-Trial Reforms Struggle to Balance Rights of Defendants and Crime Victims
March 26, 2021
by Tom Ramstack

WASHINGTON -- As Congress struggled Friday to find the fine line between protecting crime victims and suspects in pre-trial proceedings, federal prosecutors were trying to recover from an embarrassing blunder. In both cases, the federal government seeks to eliminate stumbling blocks to fair trials. At a... Read More

Kansas Welcomes First Woman of Color to Appellate Court Bench
In The States
Kansas Welcomes First Woman of Color to Appellate Court Bench
March 24, 2021
by TWN Staff

The Kansas Senate has confirmed two women to serve on the state's court of appeals, including the first woman of color to serve in that position. In doing so, the Senate took steps to assure itself neither woman would be an "activist" intent on "legislating" from... Read More

British Court Ruling Against Oil Company Could Expand Liability for Foreign Accidents
Energy
British Court Ruling Against Oil Company Could Expand Liability for Foreign Accidents
February 19, 2021
by Tom Ramstack

A ruling by Britain's top court last week that said Royal Dutch Shell oil company could be liable in English courts for pollution by its subsidiary in Nigeria, is likely to expand the company’s potential liability abroad. The court’s decision also creates a likelihood of liability... Read More

Corporate Pro Bono Initiatives Deliver Legal Aid to Those Who Need It Most
Business
Corporate Pro Bono Initiatives Deliver Legal Aid to Those Who Need It Most
October 27, 2020
by Sean Trambley

When Gwen Boyd-Willis was released from a Georgia women’s prison after a four-month sentence for fraudulently using an ATM card left in a machine, she faced new barriers to gaining employment and becoming a productive member of society. Candid with her mistakes, she wanted to make... Read More

Chicago 7 Prosecutor: 'They Were Going to Try to Destroy Our Trial. And They Did a Damn Good Job'
Civil Rights
Chicago 7 Prosecutor: 'They Were Going to Try to Destroy Our Trial. And They Did a Damn Good Job'

CHICAGO — Even five decades later, former federal prosecutor Dick Schultz has a pretty good idea of when the legendary Chicago 7 trial started to go off the rails: during the testimony of the very first witness. That day in September 1969, U.S. District Judge Julius Hoffman halted the trial after he was informed... Read More

News From The Well
scroll top