PPI Launches Policy Proposals for a ‘Do-Something’ Congress, Tackles Trade

January 19, 2019 by TWN Staff
Former President Barack Obama attends a campaign event in Anaheim for Democratic congressional candidates on September 8, 2018. From left: Josh Harder, T.J. Cox, Gil Cisneros, Barak Obama, Katie Porter, Harley Rouda, and Mike Levin. (Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times/TNS)

This week, the Progressive Policy Institute (PPI) launched a series of new ideas for a ‘Do-Something’ Congress. In an email to Democratic members of the House and Senate, PPI congratulated the elected officials on being part of “the first wave of a progressive resurgence in U.S. politics.”

The group went on to say, “We think the House Democratic Class of 2018 should adopt this simple mantra: ‘Get things done.’ Tackle the backlog of big national problems that Washington has ignored: exploding deficits and debt; run-down, second-rate infrastructure; soaring health and retirement costs; climate change and more. And yes, getting things done should include slamming the brakes on Trump’s reckless trade wars, blocking GOP efforts to strip Americans of health care, as well as repealing tax cuts for the wealthiest Americans.”

PPI launched the effort by tackling trade, offering policy proposals they say would “rein in Trump’s abuse of delegated trade powers, require greater presidential accountability, and enable Congress to nullify irresponsible tariffs and trade restrictions.” The full proposal text can be found here.

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