American Bar Association Urges Congress to Provide Aid to Tenants at Risk of Eviction

September 9, 2020 by Daniel Londono
American Bar Association Urges Congress to Provide Aid to Tenants at Risk of Eviction
Natasha Blunt poses for a portrait in New Orleans. Blunt said she was relieved to learn about the Trump administration's surprise national moratorium on evictions. (AP Photo/Dorthy Ray, File)

WASHINGTON – The American Bar Association urged Congress last week to extend a moratorium on the eviction of renters who’ve lost their jobs or been otherwise adversely impacted by the coronavirus pandemic.

A national moratorium on evictions was originally adopted as part of the CARES Act, a coronavirus relief package passed by Congress in the Spring, but its deadline elapsed two months ago.

Earlier this month the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention enacted its own moratorium using authority granted to the federal government in a 1944 public health law. 

The new ban on evictions, which went into effect Sept. 1 and is set to expire Dec. 31 is intended to keep people out of homeless shelters or other crowded living conditions that could worsen the spread of COVID-19.


While the original moratorium only covered certain types of properties, the CDC moratorium protects nearly everyone living in one of the nation’s 43 million rental households.


A Congressional extension of the moratorium was part of the House Democrats’ $3.5 billion relief bill that passed in May, but no such provision is currently in the GOP plan the Senate is scheduled to vote on Thursday.

In a letter to House and Senate leaders of both parties, Lee Reto, president of the American Bar Association, said, a failure by Congress to act “will lead to a sharp spike in unemployment and homelessness, as well as extreme demands on community health and housing services during a time of year when such resources are in highest demand.”

Reto goes on to say the negative consequences that would come with the end of the moratorium would be felt by both landlords and tenants, and that ultimately it could lead to higher rents, a dramatic reduction in the nation’s already meager affordable housing supply, and the forced homelessness of millions of Americans.


“All of these crises, to renters, landlords, property owners, and to local communities – can be averted if Congress acts now to extend the evictions and foreclosure moratoriums until a time of greater economic stability and to provide rental and mortgage assistance to vulnerable families and property owners,” Reto wrote.

The text of the ABA letter can be read here.

A+
a-

In The News

Health

Voting

Congress

October 4, 2022
by Dan McCue
Former Congressman, Blue Dog Co-Founder, Bill Brewster Dies

MARIETTA, Okla. — Former Rep. Bill Brewster, who served three terms in Congress and was a co-founder of the Blue... Read More

MARIETTA, Okla. — Former Rep. Bill Brewster, who served three terms in Congress and was a co-founder of the Blue Dog Coalition of House Democrats, died Monday after a yearlong battle with cancer. He was 80. Brewster, a graduate of Southwestern Oklahoma State University, was a... Read More

October 3, 2022
by Dan McCue
9/11-Related Illness Deaths for FDNY Will Soon Surpass Deaths on Day of Attack

NEW YORK — Within the next year, the number of members of the New York City Fire Department who will... Read More

NEW YORK — Within the next year, the number of members of the New York City Fire Department who will have died from a 9/11-related illness will surpass the number of fire fighters and emergency medical technicians who died in the terror attack 21 years ago.... Read More

October 3, 2022
by Tom Ramstack
Lawmakers Told Antisemitism is a Symptom of Bigger Domestic Extremism Problem

TEANECK, N.J. — A congressional hearing Monday started by discussing antisemitism in New Jersey but evolved into an examination of... Read More

TEANECK, N.J. — A congressional hearing Monday started by discussing antisemitism in New Jersey but evolved into an examination of what can be done about domestic extremism. The Jewish public advocacy group Anti-Defamation League reported 370 antisemitic incidents in New Jersey last year, a 25% increase... Read More

September 30, 2022
by Dan McCue
Party Line House Vote Keeps Govt. Open Through Dec. 16

WASHINGTON — The House approved a short-term stopgap spending bill Friday, averting a partial shutdown of the government that could... Read More

WASHINGTON — The House approved a short-term stopgap spending bill Friday, averting a partial shutdown of the government that could have begun at midnight. The 230-201 vote in the Democratic-led House was largely along party lines. The so-called continuing resolution passed the Senate by a 75-25... Read More

September 29, 2022
by Tom Ramstack
Disputes Linger in Congress About Biden’s Clean Energy Subsidies

WASHINGTON — After Hurricane Ian ravaged Florida with Category 4 winds, a House committee met Thursday to discuss how the... Read More

WASHINGTON — After Hurricane Ian ravaged Florida with Category 4 winds, a House committee met Thursday to discuss how the recently enacted Inflation Reduction Act might help combat climate change. Climatologists predict fierce hurricanes like Ian will become a feature of climate change that only gets... Read More

Virginia Thomas Appears for Interview With Jan. 6 Panel

WASHINGTON (AP) — Conservative activist Virginia “Ginni” Thomas, the wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, appeared on Thursday for... Read More

WASHINGTON (AP) — Conservative activist Virginia “Ginni” Thomas, the wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, appeared on Thursday for a voluntary interview with the House panel investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection. The committee has for months sought an interview with Thomas in an effort to know... Read More

News From The Well
scroll top