facebook linkedin twitter

American Bar Association Urges Congress to Provide Aid to Tenants at Risk of Eviction

September 9, 2020 by Daniel Londono
Natasha Blunt poses for a portrait in New Orleans. Blunt said she was relieved to learn about the Trump administration's surprise national moratorium on evictions. (AP Photo/Dorthy Ray, File)

WASHINGTON – The American Bar Association urged Congress last week to extend a moratorium on the eviction of renters who’ve lost their jobs or been otherwise adversely impacted by the coronavirus pandemic.

A national moratorium on evictions was originally adopted as part of the CARES Act, a coronavirus relief package passed by Congress in the Spring, but its deadline elapsed two months ago.

Earlier this month the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention enacted its own moratorium using authority granted to the federal government in a 1944 public health law. 

The new ban on evictions, which went into effect Sept. 1 and is set to expire Dec. 31 is intended to keep people out of homeless shelters or other crowded living conditions that could worsen the spread of COVID-19.

While the original moratorium only covered certain types of properties, the CDC moratorium protects nearly everyone living in one of the nation’s 43 million rental households.

A Congressional extension of the moratorium was part of the House Democrats’ $3.5 billion relief bill that passed in May, but no such provision is currently in the GOP plan the Senate is scheduled to vote on Thursday.

In a letter to House and Senate leaders of both parties, Lee Reto, president of the American Bar Association, said, a failure by Congress to act “will lead to a sharp spike in unemployment and homelessness, as well as extreme demands on community health and housing services during a time of year when such resources are in highest demand.”

Reto goes on to say the negative consequences that would come with the end of the moratorium would be felt by both landlords and tenants, and that ultimately it could lead to higher rents, a dramatic reduction in the nation’s already meager affordable housing supply, and the forced homelessness of millions of Americans.

“All of these crises, to renters, landlords, property owners, and to local communities – can be averted if Congress acts now to extend the evictions and foreclosure moratoriums until a time of greater economic stability and to provide rental and mortgage assistance to vulnerable families and property owners,” Reto wrote.

The text of the ABA letter can be read here.

Congress

House Republican Who Voted to Impeach Trump Won't Run Again

One of the 10 House Republicans who voted to impeach former President Donald Trump for his role in inciting the... Read More

One of the 10 House Republicans who voted to impeach former President Donald Trump for his role in inciting the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol announced Thursday night he will not seek reelection in Ohio next year. U.S. Rep. Anthony Gonzalez, a former NFL player... Read More

White House Warns That Debt Limit Showdown Could Hurt States

The White House is warning state and local governments about severe cuts to disaster relief, Medicaid, infrastructure grants. school money... Read More

The White House is warning state and local governments about severe cuts to disaster relief, Medicaid, infrastructure grants. school money and other programs if Congress fails to raise the U.S. debt limit. A fact sheet for state and local officials that was obtained by The Associated... Read More

September 15, 2021
by Tom Ramstack
Biden’s Build Back Better Plan Advances After House Vote

WASHINGTON -- A congressional panel raised the chances Wednesday for President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better Plan to succeed when... Read More

WASHINGTON -- A congressional panel raised the chances Wednesday for President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better Plan to succeed when it approved key portions of the bill. The House Energy and Commerce Committee voted to endorse parts of the $3.5 trillion proposal that would tackle air... Read More

September 14, 2021
by Dan McCue
Moderates Seek Changes to Drug Pricing Proposal

A group of moderate Democrats led by Rep. Scott Peters sought on Tuesday to change the House debate on how... Read More

A group of moderate Democrats led by Rep. Scott Peters sought on Tuesday to change the House debate on how prescription drug prices are set in the U.S., arguing sweeping proposals put forward by progressives could threaten passage of the $3.5 trillion budget bill. The push... Read More

September 13, 2021
by Dan McCue
Fencing Surrounding Capitol to Return Ahead of Sept. 18 Rally

The head of the U.S. Capitol Police confirmed on Monday that fencing surrounding the U.S. Capitol in the wake of... Read More

The head of the U.S. Capitol Police confirmed on Monday that fencing surrounding the U.S. Capitol in the wake of the Jan. 6 siege on the building will return ahead of a follow up rally by Trump supporters on Sept. 18. Capitol Police Chief Thomas Manger... Read More

September 13, 2021
by Reece Nations
U.S. Could Hit Debt Limit by Next Month

WASHINGTON -- The Bipartisan Policy Center, a D.C.-based think tank, released an analysis on Friday projecting that the United States’... Read More

WASHINGTON -- The Bipartisan Policy Center, a D.C.-based think tank, released an analysis on Friday projecting that the United States’ debt limit “X Date” will likely arrive between mid-October and mid-November of this year. The so-called x date represents the day on which the United States... Read More

News From The Well
scroll top