Chicago Teachers Stay Off Job Despite Tentative Deal

Striking teacher Nathan Gavzer (cq), right, a 4th year math teacher, and custodian Bernardo Rivera, Jr. hold signs on the picket line outside of Roberto Clemente Community Academy in Chicago on the tenth school day of the teachers strike, seen here on Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2019. CPS CTU (Jose M. Osorio / Chicago Tribune/TNS)

CHICAGO – Striking Chicago Teachers Union members planned to rally at City Hall Thursday morning, refusing to return to classrooms despite a tentative agreement on a contract until city officials agree to pay them for the days they have been on strike.

The last-minute issue came up just before the CTU’s House of Delegates voted 364 to 242 Wednesday evening to approve a proposed five-year contract that meets many of the teachers’ demands, including enforceable class size caps and a nurse and social worker in every school. The proposal guarantees all CTU members a 16% raise over the life of the contract.

Before taking effect, the deal must be ratified by rank-and-file union members. The voting will take place in schools 10 days after the strike is over. It’s unclear when that will be because union officials say teachers will not go back to work until they are compensated for the days they walked out.

Neither side has said anything publicly about talks resuming Thursday on the last issue. The walkout is now in its 11th day.

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(c)2019 Chicago Tribune

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Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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