California To Ban Pesticide Trump’s EPA Rescued From Elimination

August 15, 2019by Geoffrey Mohan
California regulators on Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2019, took formal legal steps to ban a widely used pesticide that had been rescued from elimination by the Trump administration despite links to developmental disorders. (Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times/TNS)

LOS ANGELES — California regulators on Wednesday took formal legal steps to ban a widely used pesticide that had been rescued from elimination by the Trump administration despite links to developmental disorders.

The move by the state Environmental Protection Agency is all but certain to draw legal challenges from Corteva Agriscience (formerly Dow AgroSciences), which has pushed back at attempts by environmentalists to ban the chemical, chlorpyrifos, on a federal level.

The state is the largest user of chlorpyrifos — more than 900,000 pounds of it was applied in 2017 to almonds, grapes, citrus, alfalfa, stone fruit, cotton and other crops, according to state data.

Exposure to the organophosphate nerve agent has been linked to developmental disorders and neurological damage in animals and humans.

The ban is the first time the state has unilaterally barred an actively used pesticide and will take effect in 15 days unless opposing parties request an administrative hearing.

It was unclear Wednesday whether the federal EPA could challenge California, which often goes its own way on many environmental matters, including auto emissions and climate regulation. An official from that agency was not available for comment.

While most states follow the federal EPA’s lead on pesticides, California reserves the right to revoke registrations of the chemicals within its borders, said state EPA chief Jared Blumenfeld.

“Certainly, God knows, I cannot predict what this federal government will do,” Blumenfeld said.

“They have that same science; they have that same legal basis, and yet, based on what appears from the outside to just be politics, they’ve been foot-dragging — and in fact worse than that, not taking their regulatory role seriously,” Blumenfeld said. “We have to step into the void and take action where the federal government has failed to do so.”

The state has been gradually tightening its restrictions on use of the chemical, so “farmers knew this was coming,” Blumenfeld said. “The handwriting has been on the wall for some time.”

Although growers have cut their use of the chemical by about half over the past decade, they have been uneasy about the state’s earlier signals that a ban was coming.

The citrus industry uses chlorpyrifos to combat the Asian citrus psyllid, which can spread a disease that can decimate entire groves. The pesticide also is critical to controlling leaffooted bugs and stink bugs in almond groves.

“California farmers are resilient, but the long-term viability of our farms in California depends on proper support from the administration and renewed cooperation of the state’s regulatory agencies, especially in light of the many other unique and expensive regulations that place California farmers at a growing competitive disadvantage,” Tom Nassif, president and chief executive of Western Growers, a regional industry group, said in May.

Val Dolcini, acting director of the state EPA’s Department of Pesticide Regulation, said he was “quite confident” that a newly formed working group, including academic, agricultural, regulatory and environmental experts, would identify an array of alternatives to the chemical. The state has allocated about $5 million in grants toward that end, he said.

Chlorpyrifos has become something of a poster child for the Trump administration’s rollback of regulation, which has occurred at times in defiance of scientific findings about health and environmental harm.

Former EPA administrator Scott Pruitt halted an Obama-era ban that had been hastened by a court order, and his successor, Andrew Wheeler, has since extended the safety review of the pesticide through 2022. California, six other states and a host of environmental and labor groups have sued over those moves.

———

©2019 Los Angeles Times

Visit the Los Angeles Times at www.latimes.com

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

State News

Judge Rules Against Florida on Felons Paying Fines to Vote
State News
Judge Rules Against Florida on Felons Paying Fines to Vote

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — A Florida law requiring felons to pay legal fees as part of their sentences before regaining the vote is unconstitutional for those unable to pay, or unable to find out how much they owe, a federal judge ruled Sunday. The 125-page ruling... Read More

US Faces a Memorial Day Like No Other
In The News
US Faces a Memorial Day Like No Other

(AP) — Americans prepared to mark a Memorial Day like no other as the coronavirus pandemic upended traditional commemorations. U.S. authorities warned beach-goers to heed social distancing rules to avoid a resurgence of the virus that has infected 5.4 million people worldwide and killed over 345,000,... Read More

Former Elections Judge Pleads Guilty to Accepting Bribes to Fix Primary Results
Criminal Justice
Former Elections Judge Pleads Guilty to Accepting Bribes to Fix Primary Results
May 22, 2020
by Dan McCue

A former elections judge in Philadelphia pleaded guilty to accepting cash and "other things of value" in return for tampering with the results of city primary elections over several years, the Justice Department announced Thursday. Domenick J. Demuro pleaded guilty to “conspiring to deprive persons of... Read More

Dam Disaster Raises Concerns Communities Not Prepared For “Rough” Hurricane Season
State News
Dam Disaster Raises Concerns Communities Not Prepared For “Rough” Hurricane Season
May 21, 2020
by Gaspard Le Dem

Thousands of Michigan residents were forced to evacuate their homes on Wednesday after heavy rains caused two dams to fail in Midland county, about 120 miles northwest of the city of Detroit. The breaches of the Edenville and Sanford Dams sent a deluge of water into... Read More

Trump Threatens Aid Freeze for Michigan, Nevada Over Baseless ‘Voter Fraud’ Charge
Political News
Trump Threatens Aid Freeze for Michigan, Nevada Over Baseless ‘Voter Fraud’ Charge

President Donald Trump took a page from his Ukraine scandal playbook Wednesday and threatened to withhold federal aid for Michigan and Nevada if the states allow residents to vote by mail in November’s general election. Trump, who was impeached last year for holding up $391 million... Read More

As All 50 States Start Reopening, Questions on Virus Tracking Data Fuel Concerns
State News
As All 50 States Start Reopening, Questions on Virus Tracking Data Fuel Concerns

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis is defending his administration’s reporting of coronavirus data, after a state Department of Health manager said she was fired for refusing to manipulate COVID-19 tracking data as officials moved to reopen the state. Rebekah Jones, who was in charge of Florida’s online... Read More

Straight From The Well
scroll top