Blue Dog’s McAdams Stands Up Against Congressional Pay Raise

June 11, 2019 by Dan McCue
Congressman Ben McAdams

WASHINGTON – Representative Ben McAdams wants to block a salary increase for members of Congress that is automatically set to take effect in January.

Toward that end he’s introduced an amendment to the roughly $1 trillion package of spending bills on the floor of the House this week that would bar funding for a cost-of-living increase for members of Congress.

“The federal budget deficit is $738 billion for the first eight months of this fiscal year, putting us on the unbelievable path of digging a nearly $1 trillion budget hole by the end of September,” said McAdams, who is a member of the Democrats’ Blue Dog Coalition, which advocates for fiscal responsibility.

“Borrowing any money to give members of Congress a pay raise would add insult to injury and it is nowhere on my list of legislative priorities,” he said.

Under a 1989 ethics law that set cost-of-living increases for lawmakers, members are slated to receive a 2.6% increase of $4,500 in January.

The salary for rank-and-file House and Senate lawmakers is $174,000, but those with official leadership titles and responsibilities make more. That level has been frozen since 2009 and each year appropriators have written into law that no pay raises would be given to members.

In an interview with The Well News earlier this week, McAdams said balancing budgets has been a concern of his since his days as mayor of Salt Lake County, and in the Utah State Senate, but he said he’s never felt more urgency to try to rein in government spending than he does today.

“I know some might see a $4,500 raise for a member of Congress as a drop in the bucket when it comes to something as large as the federal budget, but the path we are on fiscally as a country is unsustainable and it really is squeezing out our ability to invest in the future,” the first-term congressman said.

McAdams submitted a one-sentence amendment to the Rules Committee that simply states no cost of living adjustment will be made for members of Congress for the next fiscal year.

His amendment is to the Legislative branch appropriations bill, which funds Congressional operations.

“What this is about is it being high time for us to have an honest conversation, among members of both parties, about what our fiscal priorities really are … and we need to recognize that this is a zero sum game,” McAdams said. “We’ve got to decide what’s important.”

“I also think it’s time for someone to start talking about debt because debt and deficits matter,” he continued. “Frankly, I think it’s tone deaf to be contemplating raising congressional pay at a time when we have record deficits and the national debt is exceeding $22 trillion.”

“Since last October, according to the Congressional Budget Office, spending for net interest on the public debt increased by 16 percent,” McAdams added. “Interest payments on the debt are the fastest growing part of the budget and it is immoral to keep adding that financial burden to our children and grandchildren.

“Only in Congress could you hike your own pay without regard to performance or fiscal responsibility, and I think doing so sends the wrong message to the American people,” he said.

Whatever becomes of his attempt to block the pay raise, McAdams said it is critical that Congress put itself on a trajectory toward balancing the federal budget and to do so quickly.

“That’s going to take a lot of touch choices, and we may not be able to fund a lot of the things we’d like to,” he said. “But this is why I ran for office. For me, it’s always been about fighting for fiscal responsibility.”

McAdams said during his tenure as Salt Lake County mayor, from 2013 to 2019, his administration balanced the budget every year with bipartisan support.

“It was difficult. You have to pinch pennies, because the pennies add up and at the end of the day, little things matter,” he said.

“And that gets back to what I was saying about the message we send to the American people through our actions,” he continued. “Yes, the economy is prosperous right not. But we all know that not everyone is participating in that prosperity.

“Until it is, I don’t think members of Congress should be increasing our own salaries,” he said.

McAdams isn’t alone in trying to stop the pay increase. Representative Jared Golden, D- Maine, has teamed up with Representative Brian Fitzpatrick, R-Penn., to offer a bipartisan amendment to continue the pay freeze. Two Republicans, Representatives Jack Bergman, R-Mich., and Scott Perry, R-Penn., are also said to have proposals in the works of their own.

McAdams told The Well News that he’s spoken to colleagues on both sides of the aisle who agree now is not the time for a congressional pay raise, and he believed that ultimately, they’ll all be working together to stop the January increase.

“It’s just commonsense,” McAdams said. “You know, when I was growing up it was said Rule No. 1 is, when you find yourself in a hole, stop digging until you find a way out.

“I believe we can come together in a bipartisan fashion to address the tough challenges that we need to work on, first and foremost, the debt and the budget deficit, but beyond that things like immigration reform, and reining in the high cost of prescription drugs,” he said.

In addition to the amendment he introduced this week, McAdams is backing a balanced budget amendment.

“It’s similar to proposals that have been introduced by Blue Dog members in the past; what’s different now is that we have a Democratic majority in the House and it’s time for us to set the agenda and show that we can lead in a fiscally responsible manner — something we didn’t see when the Republicans were in the majority and our deficit only grew larger.”

McAdams also said he wouldn’t be surprised if balancing the budget doesn’t become a major issue in the 2020 presidential election.

“I can definitely see that happening,” he said.

“The national debt and the deficit are bipartisan problems. Both parties have to share responsibility for putting us in the situation we’re in … and honestly, we’re not going to get out of this situation without people from both parties working together,” McAdams said. “So I hope it is part of the conversation during the presidential election and that the American people come to understand that there are elected officials in Washington who take this issue seriously and are going to work hard to get us out of this situation.”

North Carolina a Battleground State Brimming with Controversies
2020 Elections
North Carolina a Battleground State Brimming with Controversies
September 26, 2020
by Dan McCue

WASHINGTON - In the battleground state of North Carolina the conventional wisdom is simply put: President Donald Trump can win re-election even if he just squeaks out a victory in the Tar Heel State, but he might as well pack his bags for Mar-a-Lago Election Night... Read More

Trump and Biden Wage a Big Battle Over One Electoral Vote in Rural Maine
2020 Elections
Trump and Biden Wage a Big Battle Over One Electoral Vote in Rural Maine

BANGOR, Maine — Maine is getting an outsized share of Trump love these days. The president visited a remote town of 1,500 in June. His son and daughter-in-law, Eric and Lara Trump, have stumped in the state. A lobsterman from tiny Swan’s Island spoke at the... Read More

Native Americans Feel Double Pain of COVID-19 and Fires ‘Gobbling Up the Ground’
Wildfires
Native Americans Feel Double Pain of COVID-19 and Fires ‘Gobbling Up the Ground’

When the first fire of the season broke out on the Hoopa Valley Reservation in Northern California in July, Greg Moon faced a dilemma. As Hoopa’s fire chief and its pandemic team leader, Moon feared the impact of the blaze on the dense coniferous forests of... Read More

Threats of Arrest, Job Loss and Surveillance. China Works to Erase Its ‘Model Minority’
China
Threats of Arrest, Job Loss and Surveillance. China Works to Erase Its ‘Model Minority’

BEIJING — The herder couldn’t speak for long. His phone was being monitored, he said, as are those of many other Mongols around him. “We have no way out. There’s nothing we can do,” said Gangbater, a herder in Xilingol League, a central part of China’s... Read More

‘Disgusted’ Voters in the Philly Suburbs Could Help Biden Offset Trump’s Gains in Pennsylvania
2020 Elections
‘Disgusted’ Voters in the Philly Suburbs Could Help Biden Offset Trump’s Gains in Pennsylvania

PHILADELPHIA — Sandy Arnell used to work for Republican lawmakers in Washington and in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania’s capital. She considered herself to be liberal on issues like abortion but conservative when it came to fiscal issues. She didn’t always vote Republican. But she identified as one, and... Read More

Trump Picks Judge Amy Coney Barrett for Supreme Court
Supreme Court
Trump Picks Judge Amy Coney Barrett for Supreme Court
September 25, 2020
by Dan McCue

WASHINGTON - President Donald Trump will announce Saturday that he plans to nominate U.S. Appeals Court Judge Amy Comey Barrett to replace the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court. According to the White House, Trump will make the formal announcement at 5 p.m.... Read More

News From The Well
scroll top